The Tale of Jason and the Golden Trout

Fly fishing can be a dangerous obsession. Anglers are compelled to travel down unknown roads and rivers while on the quest for ever-more elusive fish. In fact, some wise fishing writer, whose name is long gone from my memory, once identified five stages that all fly fishers pass through on that often-perilous journey.

What is Low-Petroleum Fly Fishing?

After more than 30 years fly fishing, I’ve learned that the White River does not need any more gasoline motors. Besides being loud and disruptive, motors use both gasoline and motor oil. Every gas-powered motor trickles a steady stream of oil into the river as the engine runs. Water is pumped through the engine for cooling, and the water expelled leaves an oily sheen on the surface behind every boat.

‘Bangin’ Tony’s Hole’ and Other Fishing Adventures with Kyle Faulkner

Tony hated his hole getting banged so hard. Who could blame him? That’s because Kyle Faulkner and I had just caught nearly every trout trapped in a shallow, White River side-chute near Tony’s house. Helplessly, Tony watched from the shore, and paced back and forth as our rods bent repeatedly with heavy trout on nearly every cast. “You don’t have to keep them all,” Tony cried from the riverbank.

Boating Safety on the White River and Buffalo National River Must Improve

I am a fly fishing guide on the White River in Buffalo City, Arkansas, and I need your help to improve boating safety on Arkansas rivers. I have lived in Buffalo City since 2017, and been a licensed Arkansas fishing guide since 2011, but I have fished the area more than 30 years, since the late 1980s. There have always been a good number of motor boats and non-motorized watercraft on the river, but in recent years that number has increased to the critical point. In fact, I have never seen so many boats of all kinds on the White River.

Wild Steelhead Forever

Recent news that 2021 chinook salmon runs on the Nooksack River in Washington State have all died due to an algae in historically low and hot river water, does not bode well for any of the Pacific Northwest salmon species, including wild steelhead.

Trophy Trout, Midnight Trains and Barking Beagles: Remembering Brainard’s Bend Resort on the White River

Many years before the improved boat ramp and parking lot were built at Rim Shoals Public Access on the White River, a fun and now-forgotten resort for anglers was located there along the shore in the early 1990s, called Brainard’s Bend. If you didn’t mind camping near the railroad tracks – and bolting awake when the midnight train blew its whistle as it rolled through the valley mere feet from your tent – the small resort was the perfect place for budget anglers.